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  • Ermine Herman

THE CDC CHANGES THE CLEANING PROTOCOLS FOR SARS-CoV-2

The science has proven that there is a low risk for people to be infected by SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19) through contact with infected surfaces and objects. They have concluded however, that infection happens through exposure to respiratory droplets: close contact with infected person or via viral particles which are airborne.

Given the above statement, as of April 5, 2021, the CDC has determined that the cleaning protocols should be as follows:

  • Clean surfaces with soap and water ONCE a day.

  • ONLY use a disinfectant if the following occurs:

  • High rate of community spread

  • People not wearing masks indoors

  • Infrequent hand hygiene

  • Space occupied by at-risk individuals.

  • In case of a known positive case indoors, do the following:

  • Clean with soap and water AND disinfect before occupancy if <24 hours have elapsed since the infected person was last in the space.

  • Clean with soap and water if > 24 hours have elapsed since the infected person was last in the space.

  • No additional cleaning is required if >3 days have elapsed since the infected person was last in the space.


The above change in protocols indicate that in many schools and workplaces, over-sanitization is not necessary. However, engineering controls should be implemented indoors, which will reduce the risk of spread from airborne transmission. In an environment with poor ventilation, the droplets can dry quickly and remain suspended for many minutes to hours and travel far from the source (> 6ft) on air currents.

Hence, the CDC has indicated that the MAIN preventative approach involves improving ventilation, not only for SARS-CoV-2 but for all other indoor air pollutants. Is your indoor environment effectively ventilated? Call H&L Environmental Services to book your ventilation verification assessment.



Photo by Michelangelo Buonarroti from Pexels


References:

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2021): Cleaning and Disinfecting your facility, https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/disinfecting-building-facility.html

  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2021): Ventilation in Buildings, https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/ventilation.html

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